Nephilim got a “starred” review in Library Journal

Nephilim_Cover

“Set in Stockholm, this thriller plunges us into a mystery of biblical origins but modern implications. Nova Barakel is an ecowarrior whose focus on the greenhouse effect and corporate responsibility compels her to commit vandalism. She inadvertently becomes the prime suspect when she stumbles upon the scene of a grisly murder during a politically motivated spray painting spree. In an attack on another front, her cohorts unleash a phone virus intended to cripple the next target on their Dirty Thirty list of environmentally dangerous corporations. Several more killings, shadowing the environmentalists’ gargets, implicate the ecogroup as modern Nephilim, descendants of stowaways on Noah’s Ark. Who are the Nephilim and what is their intention? Nova becomes an unwitting participant in their ancient machinations.
Verdict: Already a major sensation in Europe, this is Schwarz’s first novel to be released in the United States. Schwarz is a trained security consultant whose IT background shows in the novel’s technical details. Inevitably compared to Stieg Larsson, Schwarz is sure to find her own place alongside the other Nordic suspense masters.”

Library Journal has the highest circulation of any librarianship journal — approximately 100,000.

A Dead Angel – Review by Cybermage

I don’t want to go into too many details and spoil the surprise but Nova stumbles on something that can have global repercussions. We dig into cyber security, angels, family secrets, and much more before the surprising and explosive finale.

Åsa Schwartz is the leading lady of eco fantasy and her new book En Död Ängel [A Dead Angel] is an ominous eco thriller, a sequel to Nefilim that takes us into the supernatural. It was a real page-turner I read in one go. This gets a warm recommendation as a more cerebral fantasy experience.

Presse here for the complete review.

Nefilim – Review by Hans Persson

Reviewed by Hans Persson, www.duarvaddulaser.se

Nephilm is Åsa Schwarz third book after …And Shackle Lilith in Chains and Stigma. The first two are connected but I can’t see any relationship with them and Nephilim.

When I read Nephilim two books came to my mind: The Da Vinci Code and Stieg Larsson’s Millennium-series. The main character here, Nova Barakel, has some similarities with Lisbeth Salander even though she is not quite as extreme and thereby more believable. When it comes to the story it is a typical thriller with action and biblical mysticism in an (un)holy mixture, but contrary to Dan Brown the wording is more nimble and restricted to a reasonable amount.

Nova is a Greenpeace activist who is involved in a plot where she is supposed to paint insults on the walls in the home of Vattenfall’s [a major Swedish corporation] VP because Vattenfall is at the top of the list of companies that pollute the environment. When she is has written on a few places in the apartment she discovers that the owner is actually at home – murdered. Nova flees, but realises that she will be one of the people that the police will want to contact.

After that opening the story alternates between Nova and the police officers that are trying to catch the killer (including a couple of flashbacks). As usual, the interchanging thriller perspective makes you want to know what happens to the person you just left and therefore read some more, so this book is easy to finish.
On paper this is Fantasy, but the fantastical elements are explained to the reader rather than being shown directly. Based on what is actually shown you could say that it is all a scam in order to make Nova believe in the right things, however there is nothing in the book to supports this interpretation.

Summarily it is, simply, a really good thriller.